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Epiform E530 | Coil impregnation liquid


Main features
  • Good coil impregnation
  • Low viscosity
  • Adhesion at high temperatures

Product Description

Epiform E-530 is a one component epoxy resin, used for coil impregnation and fixation. It is a premixed, easy to use product with low viscosity that cures fast at moderate temperatures and exhibits excellent adhesion strength at high temperatures.

Epiform E-530 offers great heat resistance for long term reliability and excellent electrical resistance. It has a long term heat resistance (UL1446) rating of a Class H equivalent. Alternative liquids for impregnation are K-8346 and E-8982-2 while there are also powder solutions for relevant processes.

Cure condition

  • 60min @ 150°C
Product Family
E530  
20 kg

Catalog Product

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Technical Specifications

General Properties
Appearance
Appearance
Appearance at room temperature.
Yellow liquid
Pot Life
Pot Life
Pot life if the amount of time it takes for the viscosity of a material to double (or quadruple for lower viscosity materials) in room temperature after a material is mixed.

It is closely related to work life but it is not application dependent, less precise and more of a general indication of how fast a system is going to cure.
2160 hours
Specific Gravity
Specific Gravity
Specific gravity (SG) is the ratio of the density of a substance to the density of a reference substance; equivalently, it is the ratio of the mass of a substance to the mass of a reference substance for the same given volume.

For liquids, the reference substance is almost always water (1), while for gases, it is air (1.18) at room temperature. Specific gravity is unitless.
1.2
Mechanical Properties
Hardness
Hardness
Hardness is a dimensionless quantity. There is no direct relationship between measurements in one scale and their equivalent in another scale or another hardness test.
Durometer (Shore D) 84
Flexural Strength
Flexural Strength @ 25°C
Flexural Strength @ 25°C
Flexural strength, also known as modulus of rupture, or bend strength, or transverse rupture strength is a material property, defined as the stress in a material just before it yields in a flexure test. This is the flexural strength tested at Room Temperature, 25°C
132 N/mm2
Shear Strength 12.2 MPa
Tensile Strength
Tensile Strength
The tensile strength of a material is the maximum amount of tensile stress that it can withstand while being stretched or pulled before failure.

Some materials break very sharply, without plastic deformation, in what is called a brittle failure. Others, which are more ductile, including most metals, experience some plastic deformation and possibly necking before fracture.
Tensile Strength
Tensile Strength
Tensile strength determines the resistance of a material to break under tension and it measures how much elongating load (or tensile stress) it can handle before fracture.

To make it simple, it measures how much force we have to apply when pulling apart a material before it breaks.
59 MPa
Viscosity
Viscosity
Viscosity is a measurement of a fluid’s resistance to flow.

Viscosity is commonly measured in centiPoise (cP). One cP is defined as
the viscosity of water and all other viscosities are derived from this base. MPa is another common unit with a 1:1 conversion to cP.

A product like honey would have a much higher viscosity -around 10,000 cPs-
compared to water. As a result, honey would flow much slower out of a tipped glass than
water would.

The viscosity of a material can be decreased with an increase in temperature in
order to better suit an application
Viscosity 2260 mPa.s
Electrical Properties
Dielectric Constant
Dielectric Constant
Dielectric Constant (k), commonly known as relative permittivity, is a number relating the ability of a material to carry alternating current to the ability of vacuum to carry alternating current.

It determines the ability of an insulator to store electrical energy and is the ratio of electric permeability in vacuum against the electric permeability of a material.

The lower the dielectric constant (κ) and dissipation factor, the less energy is absorbed from an electric field, making it a much better insulator.

It is a dimensionless property that can be affected by various factors such as the
thickness uniformity of a material, insufficient contact between the sample and electrodes, water adsorption and contact resistance.
Dielectric Constant @ 23 ˚C/1 kHz 4
UL Rating Class H
Thermal Properties
Coefficient of Thermal Expansion (CTE)
Coefficient of Thermal Expansion (CTE)
CTE (Coefficient of thermal expansion) is a material property that is indicative of the extent to which a material expands with a change in temperature. This can be a change in length, area or volume, depending on the material.

Knowing the CTE of the layers is helpful in analyzing stresses that might occur when a
system consists of an adhesive plus some other solid component.
Coefficient of Thermal Expansion (CTE), α1
Coefficient of Thermal Expansion (CTE), α1
CTE α1 (alpha 1) is the slope of the Coefficient of thermal expansion in a temperature range below the Glass transition temperature (Tg).

It explains how much a material will expand until it reaches Tg.
67 ppm/°C
Coefficient of Thermal Expansion (CTE), α2
Coefficient of Thermal Expansion (CTE), α2
CTE α2 (alpha 2) is the slope of the Coefficient of thermal expansion in a temperature range above the Glass transition temperature (Tg).

It explains the extent to which a material will expand after it passes Tg.
192 ppm/°C
Gel Time
Gel Time
Gel time is the time it takes for a material to reach such a high viscosity (gel like) that it is no longer workable.

It is usually measured for different temperature conditions and even though it does not refer to full cure it is advisable to never move or manipulate the material after it reached its gel time since it can lose its desired end properties.
Gel Time @ 160°C / 320°F 124 sec
Glass Transition Temperature (Tg)
Glass Transition Temperature (Tg)
The glass transition temperature for organic adhesives is a temperature region where the polymers change from glassy and brittle to soft and rubbery. Increasing the temperature further continues the softening process as the viscosity drops too. Temperatures between the glass transition temperature and below the decomposition point of the adhesive are the best region for bonding.

The glass-transition temperature Tg of a material characterizes the range of temperatures over which this glass transition occurs.
179 °C
Specific Heat Capacity
Specific Heat Capacity
Specific heat capacity is the amount of heat energy required to raise the temperature of a substance per unit of mass. The specific heat capacity of a material is a physical property. It is also an example of an extensive property since its value is proportional to the size of the system being examined.
1.3 J/g °C

Additional Information

The specification values were measured in samples that have went through the following curing schedule:

  • 100℃ ×1hour +
  • 150℃ ×1hour+
  • 180℃ ×3hour