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Epiform EPX-7410 | Grey Coil Insulation Epoxy Coating Powder

Harmonization Code : 3907.30.00.90 |   Polyacetals, other polyethers and epoxide resins, in primary forms; polycarbonates, alkyd resins, polyallyl esters and other polyesters, in primary forms : Epoxide resins : Other
Main features
  • EV motor insulation coating
  • High temperature resistance
  • Multiple application methods

Product Description

Epiform EPX-7410 is an epoxy coating powder mainly designed for insulation coating of HEV and EV motor, which can be applied by electrostatic bed, electrostatic spray, and fluidized bed coating. It doesn't crack or swell even after 1000 hours at 280°C.

Epiform EPX-7410 offers high temperature resistance and excellent insulation properties. This light yellow liquid has great dielectric performance and manages to achieve a Class H UL rating equivalent.

 

Product Family
EPX-7410  
15 kg

Catalog Product

Unlike other products we offer, the products listed on this page cannot currently be ordered directly from the website.
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Technical Specifications

General Properties
Color
Color
The color
Light yellow
Mechanical Properties
Shear Strength 10 MPa
Tensile Modulus
Tensile Modulus
Tensile modulus is a mechanical property that measures the stiffness of an elastic material. It is the slope of stress / strain curve of a material under direct tensile loading.

It can be used to predict the elongation or elastic deformation of an object as long as the stress is less than the tensile strength of the material. Elastic deformation is caused by stretching the bonds between atoms and the deformation can be reversed when the load is removed.

Tensile modulus is affected by temperature and is an important engineering attribute since we generally want to keep elastic deformation as small as possible.
Tensile Modulus @25°C 5700 N/mm2
Tensile Strength
Tensile Strength
The tensile strength of a material is the maximum amount of tensile stress that it can withstand while being stretched or pulled before failure.

Some materials break very sharply, without plastic deformation, in what is called a brittle failure. Others, which are more ductile, including most metals, experience some plastic deformation and possibly necking before fracture.
Tensile Strength
Tensile Strength
Tensile strength determines the resistance of a material to break under tension and it measures how much elongating load (or tensile stress) it can handle before fracture.

To make it simple, it measures how much force we have to apply when pulling apart a material before it breaks.
130 MPa
Electrical Properties
Dielectric Constant
Dielectric Constant
Dielectric Constant (k), commonly known as relative permittivity, is a number relating the ability of a material to carry alternating current to the ability of vacuum to carry alternating current.

It determines the ability of an insulator to store electrical energy and is the ratio of electric permeability in vacuum against the electric permeability of a material.

The lower the dielectric constant (κ) and dissipation factor, the less energy is absorbed from an electric field, making it a much better insulator.

It is a dimensionless property that can be affected by various factors such as the
thickness uniformity of a material, insufficient contact between the sample and electrodes, water adsorption and contact resistance.
Dielectric Constant @ 23 ˚C/1 kHz 2.62
UL Rating Class H
Volume Resistivity
Volume Resistivity
Volume resistivity, also called volume resistance, bulk resistance or bulk resistivity is a thickness dependent measurement of the resistivity of a material perpendicular to the plane of the surface.
1.0x1016 Ohms⋅cm
Thermal Properties
Coefficient of Thermal Expansion (CTE)
Coefficient of Thermal Expansion (CTE)
CTE (Coefficient of thermal expansion) is a material property that is indicative of the extent to which a material expands with a change in temperature. This can be a change in length, area or volume, depending on the material.

Knowing the CTE of the layers is helpful in analyzing stresses that might occur when a
system consists of an adhesive plus some other solid component.
Coefficient of Thermal Expansion (CTE), α1
Coefficient of Thermal Expansion (CTE), α1
CTE α1 (alpha 1) is the slope of the Coefficient of thermal expansion in a temperature range below the Glass transition temperature (Tg).

It explains how much a material will expand until it reaches Tg.
31 ppm/°C
Coefficient of Thermal Expansion (CTE), α2
Coefficient of Thermal Expansion (CTE), α2
CTE α2 (alpha 2) is the slope of the Coefficient of thermal expansion in a temperature range above the Glass transition temperature (Tg).

It explains the extent to which a material will expand after it passes Tg.
105 ppm/°C
Glass Transition Temperature (Tg)
Glass Transition Temperature (Tg)
The glass transition temperature for organic adhesives is a temperature region where the polymers change from glassy and brittle to soft and rubbery. Increasing the temperature further continues the softening process as the viscosity drops too. Temperatures between the glass transition temperature and below the decomposition point of the adhesive are the best region for bonding.

The glass-transition temperature Tg of a material characterizes the range of temperatures over which this glass transition occurs.
165 °C

Additional Information

Appearance change @ 280°C

 

Bending strength change @250°C and 280°C